Three examples of newsjacking done right

January 11, 2018 / by Lucas Wiseman

Newsjacking Guide.jpgIn a recent blog, we gave three of examples of newsjacking, the art of latching on to an emerging trending story, gone horribly wrong. Now, let’s look at three examples of newsjacking executed perfectly.

If you aren’t sure what newsjacking is, it can be a valuable tool in generating coverage of yourself, your business or your clients. If you’re interested in learning more, be sure to download our newsjacking guide.

Targeting the Olympics

St. Vincent Sports Performance (SVSP) had a prominent presence at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, providing much-needed training services for athletes and their families. SVSP sent a dozen staff members to run an Athlete Recovery Center. However, its presence in Rio also presented potential opportunities.

With so much expertise onsite in Rio, they prepared themselves for any newsjacking opportunities that might occur around sports performance. So, when Michael Phelps showed up on television with a bunch of red circles on his body from cupping, they knew they had something.

SVSP immediately activated its extensive list of Olympics writers to inform them that SVSP provided cupping as a service. As a result, SVSP Executive Director Ralph Reiff did numerous national and international interviews by newsjacking the cupping issue.

Oreo Shines Bright

The Super Bowl is one of the biggest events of the year, so when the power went out in the Superdome during the 2013 game between San Francisco and Baltimore, it was big news.

During the 34-minute power outage, Oreo jumped on the opportunity and posted a simple, yet clever, message on Twitter stating “You can still dunk in the dark.” The post was retweeted 10,000 times in the first hour it was posted.

Snickers Takes a Bite

During a 2014 World Cup game, Uruguay’s Luis Suarez caused an immediate controversy when he apparently bit Italian player Giorgio Chiellini. Many brands saw an opportunity here, but no one did it better than Snickers.

Shortly after the incident, Snickers posted a tweet with a graphic that said “More satisfying than Italian” and used the hashtags #worldcup, #luissuarez and #EatASNICKERS to maximize reach. The result? The post was retweeted more than 40,000 times.

If you’re interested in discussing how newsjacking can be used as a public relations tool to help promote your business, reach out to me at lwiseman@chargegf.com or download our eBook.

Download our PR Newsjacking Guide